A Baltic Adventure

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Main Tour  |  A Baltic Adventure

23 September - 8 October 2018

All three Baltic States, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia will be celebrating the Centenary of the Restoration of the State in 2018 with many public celebratory events planned, which will create a memorable experience.

Join us for an adventurous and revitalising 16-day experience visiting the magnificent Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Be captivated by what the Baltics offer, sights and activities not offered by other countries in East or East Central Europe. Wander the charming cobbled streets and laneways, immerse yourself in the exquisitely diverse baroque, art nouveau, renaissance and medieval architecture, artistic bohemian and modern culture, and magnificent landmarks found in the Baltic cities. Not to mention the culinary delights.

We visit the fascinating Baltic countryside, where we explore island and medieval castles, Rundale Palace, the Versailles of Latvia and Pazaislis Monastery, Lahemaa National Park, villages and towns which showcase interesting snapshots of life in the Baltic Region.

Travel Itinerary

Download a copy of the full  travel itinerary to learn more about this amazing trip.

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Pre-Tour 1  |  Picturesque Prague

14 - 17 September 2018

Wander the charming cobbled streets, and explore ancient landmarks and the medieval architecture of Prague. Prague is a city full of surprises. 

Pre-Tour 2  |  Charming Bohemia

17 - 23 September 2018

An exploration of discovery of one of the most magnificent cities in Eastern and Central Europe, Prague, ‘the city of a thousand spires.” We visit the ‘must sees’ including first class architectural heritage including Gothic, Romanesque, Renaissance and Baroque buildings, Charles Bridge, Old Town, Prague Castle, Estates Theatre and more.

On our travels we stop at the unusual Sedlec Ossuary or Church of the Bones, estimated to contain 40,000 human bones. We experience natural balneology at Marianske Lazne and Karlovy Vary, two of the three spa cities of the West Bohemian spa triangle, where royalty, poets and thinkers have long been attracted. There is free time for you to plan your own adventures, at your own pace, in our tours.

Travel Checklist

Download a copy of our Travellers Checklist to assist with your packing.

Travel Itinerary

Download a copy of the full  travel itinerary to learn more about this amazing trip.

Travel Checklist

Download a copy of our Travellers Checklist to assist with your packing.

Planned Itinerary

Pre-Tour 1 and 2
Main Tour

Frequently Asked Questions

Main Tour (Lithuania – Estonia – Latvia)

Weather (September - October)

The average daytime temperature in end of September/October is 12°C, with an average night time low of 4°C. There is an average of 9 hours of sunshine although the close proximity of the sea causes frequent autumn rains and fogs.

Credit Cards / ATM

Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) dispensing EUR are located all over the Baltic states 24/7. International bank cards are widely accepted and foreign currency is easily exchanged. Banks, ATMs and exchange bureaux can be found throughout Riga, Vilnius and Tallinn.

Currency

Since 2015 the euro is the only legal tender currency in Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia.

Electricity (voltage and required plugs)

The electrical supply is 220 volts AC. Plugs are standard 2-pin European.

Local Time

Latvia is in the Eastern European time zone (UTC) which is GMT +2.

Passports

All foreign visitors to Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia must possess a valid passport. Visitors are required to carry a valid ID at all times.

Water

Although tap water can be used for brushing your teeth, bottled water is recommended for everyday consumption. Local and imported bottled mineral water is also readily available.

Languages

Each country speaks it’s own language – Latvian, Lithuanian and Estonia. English is widely spoken, especially in capital cities, but also in countryside tourism places and outside them.

Tipping

Tipping is not obligatory as all service personnel is paid for their work. However 5-15% tipping is suggested as gratitude for good service in restaurants and cafes.

Internet Access

There is high speed mobile internet throughout the country if you have roaming data enabled. If not, many parts of Prague offer free internet though this can sometimes be patchy. Basically all bars/restaurants/cafes will offer wifi free of charge to their customers. Most local hotels will provide wifi free of charge, some larger international chains may charge a fee. If you plan on doing some solo sightseeing and don’t want to chew into your data, the mapy.cz app can be downloaded into your phone and provides great maps of the entire country.

Medical Services

Medical services are on a high level similar to other European countries and are provided free of charge to all residents. Tourists who seek medical assistance will be charged and are advised to take out travel insurance before travelling. The number for emegergency medical service is 155, or the Europeanwide number 112 can also be used.

Pre-Tours (Czech)

Weather (September - October)

The weather at the beginning of Autumn can be warm and sunny, cold and wet, something in between, or chopping and changing on a daily basis. Usually the end of September has nice days with a temperature in the high teens to low 20’s degrees Celsius, cooling down to around or below 10 at night.

Credit Cards / ATM

Almost every business accepts Debit and Credit cards, and ATM’s can be found in plentiful number in cities and in all towns besides small villages.

Currency

Czech Koruna (CZK – known as the Czech Crown) is used, though many tourist oriented places accepts EURO. Be careful when paying in Euro as many unscrupulous operators get a boost in profits from using a very poor exchange rate. There are also numerous scams operating on the streets of Prague where shady characters offer “special” rates and end up giving clueless tourists worthless Bulgarian roubles. If exchanging cash, always do some due diligence as to the current exchange rate. There are numerous exchange outfits that offer poor rates (including at the airport). The place with the best rates and reputation in the country is simply called “eXchange” and is located at Kaprova 14/13 in central Prague. Citing a well known example, the current exchange rate is around 1EUR=26CZK. At eXchange their rate is around 25.5, a bank may give you 25, but many well-signed places in the centre may give you as little as 15. This means that you will get almost half of what your money is worth. It really pays to be awake! OR, just get money out at an ATM.

Electricity (voltage and required plugs)

The Czech Republic uses the same two pronged Type C power sockets that are found elsewhere in continental Europe at 230V. If you forget your adapter, any electronics store here will stock one that you can purchase.

Local Time

The Czech Republic runs on GMT+1, being an hour ahead of the UK and in sync with the rest of mainland Europe. Daylight savings kicks in on the last Sunday in October and ends on the last Sunday of March.

Passports

The Czech Republic is part of the European Schengen zone. Technically you are not required to carry a passport to cross borders between member countries if carrying a valid European ID. If you are a non-citizen of the EU you are required to have a valid passport with visa dependant on your country’s European visa status. Hotels are required by law to view your passport or ID and log some information which they must then pass along to the foreign police.

Water

All mains water throughout the country is safe to drink, though if in a small village or somewhere in nature, you may encounter well water that may or may not be safe to drink. Generally speaking though, if it is coming from a tap it is perfectly safe to drink for locals and foreigners alike. The water is not fluoridated.

Languages

Czech is spoken, but particularly in touristy towns, English and German are widely spoken, especially by younger people, or people in tourist – oriented trades. Older generations generally speak Russian and sometimes German as secondary languages.

Tipping

Tipping is commonplace and expected in many cases, and appreciated in all instances. This applies mainly in restaurants and for tour guides. Staff in higher end hotels may also be commonly tipped if helping with bags etc.. In restaurants a tip can vary from rounding up the bill in village pubs, to a customary 10% in better establishments. Asides from nightclubs, most bars in the Czech Republic enforce table service, meaning the bill is calculated at the end, and a tip is expected from the waiter. In a nightclub where you must approach the bar, a tip is generally not expected.

Internet Access

There is high speed mobile internet throughout the country if you have roaming data enabled. If not, many parts of Prague offer free internet though this can sometimes be patchy. Basically all bars/restaurants/cafes will offer wifi free of charge to their customers. Most local hotels will provide wifi free of charge, some larger international chains may charge a fee. If you plan on doing some solo sightseeing and don’t want to chew into your data, the mapy.cz app can be downloaded into your phone and provides great maps of the entire country.

Medical Services

Medical services are on a high level similar to other European countries and are provided free of charge to all residents. Tourists who seek medical assistance will be charged and are advised to take out travel insurance before travelling. The number for emegergency medical service is 155, or the Europeanwide number 112 can also be used.